The Physical and Chemical Properties of Activated Nanocarbon produced from Robusta (Coffea Canephora) Coffee Pulp under slow pyrolysis method

Authors

  • Nurmalita Nurmalita Graduate School of Mathematics and Applied Science, Universitas Syiah Kuala, Darussalam, Banda Aceh, Aceh, Indonesia. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0363-1807
  • Raudhatul Raihan Magister Program in Renewable Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Malikussaleh. Lhokseumawe, Aceh, Indonesia. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1007-7138
  • Zulkarnain Jalil Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, Aceh, Indonesia. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2153-7045
  • Syahrun Nur Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Syiah Kuala, Darussalam, Banda Aceh, Aceh, Indonesia. https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5877-6491
  • Adi Setiawan Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Malikussaleh, Jalan Batam, Bukit Indah, Lhokseumawe, Indonesia. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3967-542X

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.25186/.v17i.2019

Abstract

This study examines the physical and chemical properties of nano-activated carbon obtained from Robusta coffee pulp. It also examines the potential use of Robusta coffee pulp biomass as a raw material for hydrogen storage. In this investigation, the dried coffee pulp samples were carbonized using the slow pyrolysis method at temperatures of 400°C and 500°C. A biochar product was obtained and activated using NaOH and ZnCl2 solutions. The analysis results Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) suggested that both carbonization and activation processes with NaOH or ZnCl2 solutions were unable to removed the caffeine content in coffee pulp. The Differential Calorimetric Analysis/Thermogravimetric Analysis (DSC/TGA) indicated that coffee pulp carbonization reached optimality within the temperature range of 400 to 500°C. Furthermore, the Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and N2-adsorption isothermal analysis showed that the surface pores of activated carbon had a honeycomb-like structure with a size greater than 0.7 nm which is applicable for hydrogen storage material.

Key words: Activated carbon; Robusta coffee pulp; Slow pyrolysis; Surface area.

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Published

2023-01-09

How to Cite

NURMALITA, N.; RAIHAN, R. .; JALIL, Z. .; NUR, S.; SETIAWAN, A. The Physical and Chemical Properties of Activated Nanocarbon produced from Robusta (Coffea Canephora) Coffee Pulp under slow pyrolysis method. Coffee Science - ISSN 1984-3909, [S. l.], v. 17, p. e172019, 2023. DOI: 10.25186/.v17i.2019. Disponível em: http://www.coffeescience.ufla.br/index.php/Coffeescience/article/view/2019. Acesso em: 26 jan. 2023.